Mobilized Identities: Mediated Subjectivity and Cultural Crisis in the Neoliberal Era

Cameron McCarthy, Alicia Kozma, Karla Palma-Millanao, Margaret Fitzpatrick and Nicole Lamers (eds)

Published by Global Studies, a book imprint by Common Ground Publishing

Format Price
Book: Electronic $US15.00
Book: Print $US40.00

Mobilized Identities: Mediated Subjectivity and Cultural Crisis in the Neoliberal Era is a collective attempt to capture a glimpse of how modern individuals face and negotiate the crisis of global capitalism, as well as the formation of identity in the realm of media, education, and culture in a highly dense, networked world. We are living in times within which even the existence of a solidity that “melts into air” is questioned, and where individuals are forced into a type of identity-survival mode that requires the complex and simultaneous negotiations of time, space, nation, and self simply to remain intact. It is in this rapidly moving and changing terrain of social relations that the contributors of Mobilized Identities explore issues that range from popular culture and education to digital technologies and the fluidity of race and identity in a supposedly post-racial era as strategic articulations of identity creation and self-preservation.

Book: Electronic (PDF File; 9.837MB). Book: Print (Paperback). Published by Global Studies, a book imprint by Common Ground Publishing.

Dr. Cameron McCarthy

Professor, Educational Policy, Organization and Leadership, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA

Cameron McCarthy is a communication scholar and university scholar in the Department of Educational Policy, Organization and Leadership and in the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois. He has published widely on topics related to globalization, canon formation, race and the class conquest of the city, postcolonialism, problems with neoMarxist writings on race and education, institutional support for teaching, and school ritual and adolescent identities.

Alicia Kozma

Ph.D. candidate, Institute of Communications Research, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA

Alicia Kozma is a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois. She holds a B.A. in religion and film from the University of Vermont and a M.A. in American studies and film from The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her dissertation research is concerned with gendered authorship in U.S. independent cinema of the 1960s and 1970s, focusing on a case study of filmmaker Stephanie Rothman. Her areas of interest coalesce around the theoretical and practical issues surrounding gender in film, cultural worth/taste culture in film and television, marginalized media products, female media production, cult media, affect, and sexuality studies.

Karla Palma-Millanao

Ph.D. candidate, Communications and Media, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA

Karla Palma-Millanao has developed her passion for communications and local development around the world. For years she worked with different NGOs and local organizations throughout Chile in the development of communication strategies, especially with communities that were affected by the violation of their human rights. Currently Karla is pursuing a doctoral program in communications and media as a Fulbright scholar at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Karla is a journalist from the Universidad de La Frontera in Temuco, Chile with a specialization in human rights and public policies. Karla studies the way the mining industry in Chile develops technologies and shapes values within Chilean society

Margaret Fitzpatrick

Ph.D. candidate, Global Studies in Education, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA

Margaret Fitzpatrick is a Ph.D. candidate in global studies in education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she also teaches global studies to undergraduates. An experienced international high school English and social studies teacher, she has taught in Japan, South Korea, Egypt, Kuwait, New Mexico, Minnesota, Michigan, and Illinois. She holds a B.A. in English from UIUC, an M.A. in communication from Stanford University, and an M.A. in curriculum and instruction from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her research interrogates the experiences of knowledge workers operating within a globalizing paradigm, and in particular the perspectives of international educators.

Nicole Lamers

International Education Specialist, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA

Nicole Lamers is the international education specialist for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She received her Ph.D. in educational policy studies, with an emphasis on global studies in education and her master’s in African studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on education for a global perspective, including policy, curriculum, pedagogy and practice; campus internationalization in higher education; impact of large scale global assessment systems; and understanding the relationship between citizenship and education in policy and practice.